In one word: Stressful.

TS Editor Shubhra Krishan, fresh from the ordeal, has a blow by blow account:

“There is a ‘Yellow Fever Hospital’ on the road to the international airport near Mahipalpur, Delhi. A narrow, unpaved lane takes you to the semi-wooded, neglected-looking place. The ‘cut’ is easy to miss, so drive slow or you will end up taking another round of the flyover.

Be prepared to waste an entire working day just to get the shot.

yellow fever vaccination delhi
Image: http://www.theguardian.com

For some reason, the vaccination is done only on Tuesdays and Thursdays. You are required to register at noon and come back for the shot between 2 and 4 pm. There is a queue for registration, and tempers run high as people have been sitting there since the wee hours of the morning. (You don’t need to do that, though; I suggest you arrive at about 11 am and stand patiently in the queue, which is by no means too long.

Beyond the bars of the gate, a couple of surly guards stand, making you feel like a caged species of some sort, angry and puzzled at being held up without warning. Now that I have warned you, do be prepared for the mental and physical ordeal.

The process can be made infinitely simpler if they start early and complete the process in one go. It is unfair to expect people to waste a full day.

Do remember to carry your passport along, or you will be sent back. Also carry Rs 300 in 100-rupee notes, and a pen that will be needed for you to fill up the form.

Once you are inside, the process is less painful. They will call out your token number in batches, and once you have received the injection, ask you to wait for 30 minutes. This is, of course, done to ensure they can attend to you if you develop a severe reaction—which is extremely rare.

Know Before You Go: yellow fever vaccine is not given to those who are allergic to eggs, undergoing cancer or TB treatment, asthmatic or pregnant.

The vaccine is valid for 10 years, which is why I suppose no one really kicks up a row over being made to waste the day; one is simply glad to get out of there, feeling sore in arm and heart.

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