Image: besthomechef.com.au
Image: besthomechef.com.au

Writer Brian Melican sums it up quite neatly in his article in the Telegraph:

“While there is no shortage of vegetarians, nouvelle cuisine, and exotic ingredients out here, the things that really get the Germans going are cabbage, potatoes, pork (mainly in sausage form), beer, and schnapps.”

A quick primer:

Wurst (German for sausage)

Sausages are most common in German cuisine with more than 1500 varieties available at street food stalls as well as fine dining restaurants. Here are some of the popular sausage dishes you should try:

Schwäbische Wurstsalat a traditional Swabian dish of sausage salad served with a dressing of onions and vinegar.

Image: moenchle.de
Image: moenchle.de

Find recipe here

Currywurstsausage cut into small pieces and served with curry and ketchup

Image: www.noordinaryhomestead.com
Image: http://www.noordinaryhomestead.com

Find recipe here

Bratwurst – minced pork and beef sausage

Image:www.schallerweber.com
Image:www.schallerweber.com

Read more here

Landjäger – sweet and spicy dry sausage

Image: www.michalski-shop.de
Image: http://www.michalski-shop.de

Gelbwursta beechwood-smoked and air dried sausage spiced with mace, ginger and cardamom

Image: www.bayern.by
Image: http://www.bayern.by

Read more here

 

Potatoes

According to the German Food Guide, an average German consumes 70 Kgs of potatoes every year!

Popular potato dishes in Germany include:

Kartoffelpuffer or Reibekuchen: Deep-fried potato pancakes served with local fruits and meat.

Image: www.flickr.com
Image: http://www.flickr.com

Find recipe here

Kartoffelklöße: These potato dumplings are a favourite in Bavaria and Rhineland.

Image: www.geocaching.com
Image: http://www.geocaching.com

Find recipe here

Kartoffelsalat: Potato salad made with a variety of ingredients such as vinaigrette and chicken broth.

Image: www.essen-und-trinken.de
Image: http://www.essen-und-trinken.de

Find recipe here

Fried potato noodles called Schupfnudeln and potato soup.

Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schupfnudel
Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schupfnudel

Find recipe here

Sauerkraut

Originally a Chinese recipe, the German Sauerkraut is finely chopped pickled cabbage with a distinct sour taste, often served with juniper berries, sausages and dumplings. Here’s a quick tutorial on how to make sauerkraut at home.

Image: www.youngandraw.com
Image: http://www.youngandraw.com

Bread

From breads made of wheat and whole grains to smooth and flavoured rolls, German bakers dish out a variety of daily delights.

Brezel: Popularly known as Pretzels, it’s Germany’s hottest selling bread.

Image: abundantpantry.com
Image: abundantpantry.com

Vollkornbrot: A national favourite, this whole wheat bread is coupled with sunflower seeds for added flavour.

Image: eatsmarter.de
Image: eatsmarter.de

Roggenmischbrot: A traditional rye bread known for its unique sour taste and aroma.

Image: www.roesner-backstube.de
Image: http://www.roesner-backstube.de

Sweet Breads & Rolls: Designed as a braided loaf, these breads have various delicious fillings of jam, raisins and almonds. Best enjoyed with a slice of butter on the crust

Desserts

Rumtrüffel: Tiny balls of chocolate with a distinct aroma of rum; a popular holiday dessert.

Image: www.chefkoch.de
Image: http://www.chefkoch.de

Wiener Apfelstrudel: A  layered pastry served with vanilla sauce

Image: helga-koenig-reiseliteratur.blogspot.com
Image: helga-koenig-reiseliteratur.blogspot.com

Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte (Black Forest Cherry cake): Traditionally made with cherry brandy, this chocolate sponge cake contains multiple layers with whipped cream, cherries and chocolate shavings on the top

Image: www.buckwoodbistro.net
Image: http://www.buckwoodbistro.net

Éclair: The German version of cream-puffs, an éclair is a long, hollow pastry filled with vanilla/coffee/chocolate filling and topped with icing.

 

Image: vk.com
Image: vk.com

Drinks

According to the Deutsche Welle website:

“On average, Germans drink about 100 liters (over 26 gallons) of beer a year – a lot less than the Czechs, who lead the table with a whopping 150 liters.”

“Where people brew beer, that’s a good place to live!” is an old Czech saying.

Meanwhile, some ideas to whet your thirst:

Apfelwine: The German version of traditional apple cider. Low alcohol content and a unique sour apple taste.

Image: dornroeschen-annelsbach.de
Image: dornroeschen-annelsbach.de

Buttergrog:  Hot, smooth, frothy drink.

Image: www.neohomesteading.com
Image: http://www.neohomesteading.com

Eierpunsch: or simply egg punch, a popular holiday drink made from egg whites, white wine and vanilla.

Image: www.verpoorten.de
Image: http://www.verpoorten.de

But the best of the lot and the highlight of the famous Munich Oktoberfest is German beer. With more than 1300 breweries in the country, you can enjoy an astounding variety of beers in Germany including the dark Altbier of lower Rhine Valley, the Kölsch of Cologne, the traditional Berliner Weiße and German Lager.

German beer

 

Prost!

Hungry for more? Chew on these:

http://www.goethe.de/ins/ie/prj/scl/ess/en179806.htm

https://www.deutschland.de/en/topic/life/lifestyle-cuisine/how-do-people-eat-in-germany

http://www.thewednesdaychef.com/the_wednesday_chef/2013/04/a-real-german-breakfast.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/expat/expatlife/9837843/Food-and-the-Germans-the-ritual-of-eating-Kraut.html

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